Family fundraise for baby’s helmet

NILABE111220e1, 3 month old Kensey Robinson, St Johns road Ilkeston.

NILABE111220e1, 3 month old Kensey Robinson, St Johns road Ilkeston.

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AN ILKESTON family are fundraising for a charity that helped their baby daughter when she was diagnosed with brachycephaly – flat head syndrome.

Kerry Robinson found out that three-month-old Kensey had the syndrome when she asked a nurse to look at her while she attended a specialist appointment with Kensey’s 21-month-old sister, Lexi, who also suffers with the problem.

NILABE111220e2, 3 month old Kensey Robinson and sister Lexi, St Johns road Ilkeston.

NILABE111220e2, 3 month old Kensey Robinson and sister Lexi, St Johns road Ilkeston.

The condition occurs because babies are born with a soft skull, and when they lay on their backs it can lead to a flat patch forming. Then, if their skulls start to harden while the head is still flat it can remain permanently.

Wearing a special helmet helps to round the head and support the skull so as the bone hardens, the skull grows and forms in the normal way.

The symptoms were spotted when Kensey was just four weeks old and was diagnosed as a severe case when she was 11 weeks.

The girls’ mum, Kerry Robinson, said: “Because Lexi had the same thing I knew how to spot it with Kensey.

NILABE111220e3, 3 month old Kensey Robinson and sister Lexi brothers James and Alfie, St Johns road Ilkeston.

NILABE111220e3, 3 month old Kensey Robinson and sister Lexi brothers James and Alfie, St Johns road Ilkeston.

“We’ve had her sleeping on a special mattress and been using a baby carrier instead of puschair so she’s not always on her back but we wanted to get her the helmet as soon as possible, that way she won’t have to wear it for as long.”

The special helmets are recommended by Technology in Motion, the centre in Leeds where the girls are attending for treatment, cost £1,950 each and are not available on the NHS.

The centre told Kerry about Tree of Hope, a children’s charity which paid for the helmet for Kensey.

She said: “We just want to give something back to them after what they have done for us.”

Kerry and her husband James also have two sons, Jamie, ten, and Alfie, seven.

Jamie also had similar symptoms as a baby but fully recovered.

Kerry added: “Jamie didn’t need to wear a helmet as his just cleared up and went away.

“Because of what happened to him and what doctors were saying we didn’t think Lexi would need any treatment until she was getting older and her skull wasn’t growing roundly.

“She will have to wear her helmet for longer but will be fine.”

To donate to the family’s collection for Tree of Hope, visit www.justgiving.com/Kerry-Robinson4.