DCSIMG

Letter: Changes to regulation are to blame for flooding

EMBARGOED TO 1800 SUNDAY MARCH 2
File photo dated 28/12/12 of a flood sign in water. Damage costs caused by devastating floods are expected to rise five-fold in Europe by 2050, say scientists. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday March 2, 2014. Climate change and the construction of more buildings and infrastructure are both said to contribute to the trend. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Floods. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

EMBARGOED TO 1800 SUNDAY MARCH 2 File photo dated 28/12/12 of a flood sign in water. Damage costs caused by devastating floods are expected to rise five-fold in Europe by 2050, say scientists. PRESS ASSOCIATION Photo. Issue date: Sunday March 2, 2014. Climate change and the construction of more buildings and infrastructure are both said to contribute to the trend. See PA story ENVIRONMENT Floods. Photo credit should read: Steve Parsons/PA Wire

This year so far has seen a lot of wet weather which has led to flooding in a lot of parts.

Now some put it down to global warming and freak weather conditions, the rivers and streams just not able to cope, or the combined sewers.

I believe the truth of the matter is that in 1983 building regulations changed, and all new-build, also extensions to existing property, meant that the surface water was to be separated and dispersed into the ground or to the nearest water course, affecting the watertable and the amount of discharge into water courses and streams.

I believe this has been going on for over 30 years with very little control, if any, in regulating the control into streams and water courses, where the natural drainage of the land formed water courses running into other larger streams and rivers. Over time this has been ignored, I feel. Past research on the River Severn, tracing back up river and up water courses, found that when trees are planted as a woodland at the lower side of fields before the natural land drainage reaches the water course it will reduce the

volume of water in long periods of wet weather entering the water course and reducing the risk of flooding.

Now this research and advice is given all around the world, just very little notice has been taken at home, I feel. Just take a look at Codnor Common Farm – if half of that was planted with trees from the water course up hill, this would not only reduce the water runoff and flooding this area already has seen, but also reduce the volume to Baily Brook, the Erewash and the River Trent. But then with no local plan for the area you wonder why you have no control over development with no legal leg to stand on in a court of law to take a developer to, and how flooding has escalated.

Norman Packham

Springfield Garden, Ilkeston

 

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