Long-service awards for loyal Treetops Hospice Care volunteers

CHARITY CHAMPIONS -- volunteers and staff, whose contribution to Treetops Hospice Care totals 360 years, are pictured with their long-service awards.
CHARITY CHAMPIONS -- volunteers and staff, whose contribution to Treetops Hospice Care totals 360 years, are pictured with their long-service awards.

Three volunteers at the Treetops Hospice Care shop in Sandiacre were among the recipients of awards recognising their long service and loyalty.

A total of 17 volunteers and staff, whose contribution to the charity totals 360 years, were honoured in a special ceremony to mark national Hospice Care Week.

And they included Glenis French, Christine Bonser and Christine Scattergood, who give up their time at the Derby Road shop. Glenis has given 30 years’ service, which was the most of any of the award-winners, while the two Christines were a couple of six volunteers to have given 25 years’ service.

The trio were handed certificates and long-service pins by the Deputy Mayor of Erewash, Coun Mary Hopkinson, in a ceremony at the Risley base of Treetops.

Coun Hopkinson said: “It’s lovely to see and hear about all the people who volunteer and work for Treetops and do such good work. They make a real difference to people’s lives. Long may the good work continue.”

The long-standing charity provides nursing care and emotional support for adults in Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire who have illnesses such as cancer, motor neurone disease and multiple sclerosis. It also helps their carers and families.

Treetops offers specialist support and information, as well as day care at its purpose-built unit in Risley. But it also works with patients in their own homes and provides therapuetic services.

The charity must raise more than £3 million each year to run the hospice, and some of this comes from its network of shops that are scattered around the two counties.

The shops help to raise awareness of the charity, as well as funds, and they sell a large range of goods donated by members of the public, from three-piece suites to egg cups, but mainly clothes, books, DVDs, household items and bric-a-brac. Some shops, including the one at Sandiacre, also sell donated items of furniture.