Brain injury charity opens support services hub at Ilkeston hospital

Brain injury charity Headway has opened four new satellite hubs to bring its support services closer to the people who need them.
Brain injury charity Headway has opened four new satellite hubs to bring its support services closer to the people who need them.

Brain injury survivors across Derbyshire will have easier access to support services this year with a leading charity opening four mobile hubs.

Headway Derby now has satellite services at the London Road, Ashbourne and Ilkeston Community Hospitals, as well as Royal Derby Hospital - with Ripley Hospital expected to join the network soon.

Debra Morris, chairman of Headway Derby, her daughter Katie Morris and brain injury case manager Alison Wright raised �3,352 from a sponsored skydive to help set up the new hubs.

Debra Morris, chairman of Headway Derby, her daughter Katie Morris and brain injury case manager Alison Wright raised �3,352 from a sponsored skydive to help set up the new hubs.

The new hubs will enable people to get advice on benefits, help with housing issues and also emotional support without the need to travel into Derby city centre.

Charity chairman Debra Morris said: “We are delighted that through this new project we will be able to both extend our services and make them easier to access for people and families coming to terms with brain injury.”

“I have been privileged to work for many years with inspirational clients who, despite life-changing injuries, go on to achieve progress in many different ways.

She added: “Rehabilitation and support is different for everyone and so vital to recovery yet so underfunded.”

Dave Harvey, 65, was the first person to attend the Royal Derby Hospital hub when it opened on December 8.

He sustained a bleed on the brain after he was involved in a motorcycle accident in July. Since then he has suffered from problems with fatigue and memory loss.

Dave said: “Having a face-to-face session is really helpful. It feels more personable and you are able to get a lot more out of it. You feel more supported.

“To know that there is somebody there if I’m feeling low is great.”

The start-up costs for the new hubs were partly met by Debra herself, who took on a sponsored skydive last year with her daughter Katie and brain injury case manager Alison Wright, raising £3,352.

Headway received a further donation of £2,000 for the project from GAP Outlet.

For more information, visit www.headwayderby.org or call 01332 986350.