Ilkeston actor Robert Lindsay helps raise £15,000 for Nottingham NSPCC

Ilkeston-born television star Robert Lindsay has helped raise �15,000 for the NSPCC in Nottingham at a special art exhibition in London.
Ilkeston-born television star Robert Lindsay has helped raise �15,000 for the NSPCC in Nottingham at a special art exhibition in London.

Ilkeston television star Robert Lindsay has helped raise £15,000 for the NSPCC in Nottingham at a special art exhibition in London.

The former My Family actor Robert Lindsay, who studied drama in Nottingham at the start of his career, was the guest of honour at the opening of Painting a Better Picture for Children on February 13.

NSPCC vice-president Jenny Farr with granddaughter Emily Thornton, who curated the exhibition.

NSPCC vice-president Jenny Farr with granddaughter Emily Thornton, who curated the exhibition.

The pop-up exhibition, at the Concept Store in Chelsea, was staged by artist Emily Thornton, the granddaughter of NSPCC vice-president Jenny Farr, who has volunteered with the Nottingham branch for more than 60 years.

Robert said: “The NSPCC has found another lifelong supporter in me.

“Having heard so much about the amazing work for the NSPCC done by the wonderful Jenny Farr at the Nottingham centre, and coming from the area myself, I’ve seen first-hand the decline in community and family values.”

He added: “As a father, it’s almost unimaginable to understand how children could be so neglected and abused by adults, and even parents, who children should be looking to for love and guidance.

“The irony is the perpetrators of these crimes are victims of early neglect and abuse themselves, it’s a vicious cycle and the NSPCC is worthy of our support to assure these kids that the world can give them safety and a sense of creative independence.

More than 30 artists donated works to the event, and each donated at least 35 per cent of sales to Jenny Farr House—the NSPCC’s Nottingham Service Centre—reaching a total of £15,063.

Emily, who lives and works in London, came up with the idea for the exhibition after being part of a campaign that Jenny led for the Nottingham branch’s 125th anniversary.

She said: “I am incredibly proud of the phenomenal amount of work my grandmother has done for the NSPCC over six decades.

“She has been a massive inspiration for me over the years so I’m delighted the exhibition has raised so much money for this fantastic charity.”

Jenny’s long service was inspired by working with children while at Nottingham City Hospital during an outbreak of polio, and has seen her raise more than £3million.

She said: “The art exhibition was a fantastic occasion featuring work by some really talented artists. I am grateful to Emily for organising it and contributing some of her own work to raise vital funds.”

For more information on the NSPCC, including how to donate or become a volunteer, visit www.nspcc.org.uk.