New flats plan for former Ilkeston pub

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A former Ilkeston pub is set to be turned into nine flats.

The Rose & Crown, in Church Street, Cotmanhay, has been vacant for four years and it is said to have been vandalised and broken into on numerous occasions during that time.

Now plans from a Mr Chohan to turn the former watering hole into flats are to be decided by Erewash Borough Council.

A planning committee meeting on Wednesday, June 26 will rule on the application, with council officers recommending approval.

The pub sits to the east of the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses and to the west of Cotmanhay Churchyard.

If approved, a two-storey extension would be built, along with a new roof to increase its height and an entire remodelling of the former pub.

A single story extension currently attached to the front of the building would be removed.

Meanwhile, an area of grass attached in the pub’s grounds would be turned into 10 parking spaces.

A shared garden would be built to the rear of the building.

Planning permission had previously been granted to turn the first floor of the pub into four flats in 2016, but this has not been implemented.

Meanwhile, the former pub car park to the west of the building had been granted approval to build four homes in 2015, but this was also not implemented and has now expired.

Later in 2015, plans were refused to turn the former pub into a bedsit and build four houses in the car park.

A council report on the application says that the building “is in a state of disrepair and the remainder of the site is overgrown and untidy”.

Objections have been sent in from four residents and the owner of the former pub car park.

The report quotes one as saying: “The new flats will overlook future residential development on the former car park. The windows will overlook the proposed garden areas.”

Another opposing resident says: “The increased size and shape of the building would be over-development, visually obtrusive, and out of character for the area.”

Other residents said that the area was currently one for old-aged pensioners and families and was unsuitable for people of a “younger age group” who would most likely move in to the flats.

However another welcomed the scheme due to the building being derelict and vandalised.

A statement submitted by Simon Foot Architects, on behalf of the applicant, says: “The building would be developed and in use, meaning that the building’s visual appearance will be enhanced and maintained.

“The site is located in an area with established public transport links reducing the chance of road congestion and making the location a more sustainable option for new housing.”

Council officers, recommending approval, wrote: “It is considered that this represents an efficient use of a building in an established residential area in Ilkeston and as such is considered acceptable in principle.

“It is considered that use of the site for nine residential flats would not create significant disturbance to neighbouring occupiers over and above either the established use as a public house or the previously approved use for four residential flats.

“Prejudice against young adults is not an appropriate matter for consideration in a planning application.”