Thousands raised in memory of popular Ilkeston plumber

Barber, Brad Knight, with electric razor at the ready, during Thursday's charity event to raise money for Pancreatic Cancer Research in memory of Frank Trower.  Also pictured are Frank's sons Luke, centre and Harley with Brad at the Deakin and White barbers' shop in Ilkeston, where they hoped to raise over �500.
Barber, Brad Knight, with electric razor at the ready, during Thursday's charity event to raise money for Pancreatic Cancer Research in memory of Frank Trower. Also pictured are Frank's sons Luke, centre and Harley with Brad at the Deakin and White barbers' shop in Ilkeston, where they hoped to raise over �500.

A staggering amount of money has been raised in memory of a popular Ilkeston plumber who lost his battle with pancreatic cancer recently.

Frank Trower, 58, died from pancreatic cancer last month.

His funeral was held on Friday June 12 at St Mary’s Church in Ilkeston and saw hundreds of people turn out to pay their respects.

His son, Luke, said: “The funeral directors, GT Edwards, said it was the biggest funeral they had ever done.

“My dad was a much loved man throughout the town with over 500 people attending the church funeral at St Mary’s.

“Someone shopping in town after asked if he was a footballer or actor because the attendance was so big.”

Since Frank’s death, £4,351 has been raised by friends and family for the charity Pancreatic Cancer UK.

This included £1,110 raised by Deakin and White barbers, on Queen Street, who are friends of the family.

On June 11, they donated all of their takings through the day to the cause.

A further £1,800 was raised through donations at the funeral and wake. And an auction, which included some John Terry football boots, saw £950 raised.

Frank ran a plumbing business in Ilkeston for 30 year before passing away.

Luke, who has a younger brother called Harley, has taken over the family business.

He added: “All of his customers loved him - they always said he was not just the local plumber he was a friend, and always speak of the warmth he brought to the room.

“He was just a general great guy.”