Village residents approve new war memorial plan

The group campaigning for a new war memorial in Stanley Common hope it will be in place for Armistice Day, 2018.
The group campaigning for a new war memorial in Stanley Common hope it will be in place for Armistice Day, 2018.

Plans for a new war memorial in Stanley Common are moving ahead after village residents voted in favour of the outline proposal.

At a meeting at the village Scout Hut on Tuesday, April 11, the vote was won by a margin of 35 to 13 after an invitation was circulated to more than 700 properties in the area.

Terry Hall, of the Stanley Common War Memorial Group, said: “So far most feedback has been positive, but one or two people did have concerns and that is why we organised the poll.

“As every individual household was invited to vote the majority is clearly shown by this result, we will proceed with the project.”

The idea for the memorial arose after it was pointed out that the memorial for the area’s war dead at the moment only contains the names of those who lived in Stanley and not Stanley Common.

That memorial commemorates six local servicemen who died during the First World War, with a dedication later added for the four who died in the Second World War.

The group will now consider where the memorial will be established and a open meeting will be held at 7pm on Tuesday, April 25, at the Bateman Arms on Belper Road to discuss forming a committee to carry the work forward.

It is hoped that the memorial can be in place by November 1918, in order to part of commemorations marking the conclusion of the First World War.

Suggestions have so far included the grounds of All Saints’ Church and the former miners’ playing field in the centre of the village which is now held in trust.

Terry said: “There are plus and minus points for both possible sites but the group is open to other suggestions.

“If the November 2018 is to be met the group really needs an early decision on site to proceed with other necessary work like permission from the land owner, planning permission, fund raising and applying for grants.”

An early design for the monument features a five-foot tall granite obelisk, at an estimated cost of £3,000.